Hippies, Claws, and Maggie Leblanc

Books getting out to new stores — signed copies in stock now! This week’s features are New Orleans stores. Buy local if you can!

SCHEMATICS AND ASSEMBLIES OF THE COSMIC HEART at
Blue Cypress
More Fun Comics

LOVE’S RAGGED CLAWS  at
Frenchmen Art and Books

HIPPIES at
The Mushroom Records and Smoke Shop

And for you unfortunates who can’t chop local, find all through my website.

BONUS: Join me for a book club Zoom chat on my novel, Goodbye, Maggie, this Thursday, Feb. 24, 7 pm US central time. All are welcome. Zoom link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84153455299

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage         

Gabriela Marie Milton’s poems

Gabriela Marie Milton, Woman: Splendor and Sorrow: Love Poems and Poetic Prose
Reviewed by Gary Gautier

The title and subheadings of this poetry collection — “Woman: Splendor and Sorrow” (Love Poems/Poetic Prose) might mislead you into thinking that the focus is narrower in content than it is. If the focus is love, it is love in the broadest sense, a love that encompasses narrative and lyrical and archetypal forms, a fantastic array of imagery, a panorama of human and divine experience.

Imagery always comes first in poetry for me, which bodes well for Milton. Imagery, rather than something rational or polemical, drives the structure and flow (although the polemical does rear its head in the “poetic prose” near the end).

peaches will grow on one side of the moon
injured lambs will scream on the other
taste of strawberries
my hair freshly cut

your hands nailed in white marble

my love
it’s spring
it’s me
free your hands from the marble*

(The Easter of Roses)

Two points worth noting: one is the reliance upon concatenated imagery to drive the flow; the other is the little conceptual hook at the end, where the field of imagery blossoms into some nugget drenched with philosophical or emotional value.

The imagery can be beautiful (“the marble net of rustling stars”), startling (“bones cracking with love,” “with pins in his heart the pigeon still flies”), or archetypal (“moon” and “stars” and “purple seas”; from “cotton candy sunsets” to “the arms of Morpheus”), but it makes every poem concrete.

To be sure, there are other laws of motion in Milton’s poetic universe – the narrative (“I fast for nine mornings. On the tenth, I walk barefoot toward the water … I love for nine nights. On the tenth, I look for …), the anecdotal and darkly humorous (“I keep a coffin adorned with lilies in my bedroom. I sleep besides death like Sarah Bernhardt”). But the dominant movement is the free association of images, images with personal and emotional power, but most importantly (for me) with archetypal power – whether the archetypal landscape associated with a religious mythos (““resurrection” and “prophets,” “sacrifice” and “creation”) or a landscape perhaps deeper in the collective unconscious, powerful images that predate religion as we know it. Milton is fairly straightforward about the ties to the collective unconscious in the “poetic prose” section.

“My poetry is that which comes from the realm of the unfulfilled. It is the echo of the waves that you can guess but cannot see.”

Thus, toward the end of the collection, she gathers her “wounds . . . in a large wicker basket” and recounts an apparent choice she made regarding which archetypal orientation would be her final resting place.

“I did not want to go to heaven. I wanted to go to the sea.”

She does not equivocate. She makes a choice. All agency goes back to the poet. In a collection based on imagery and suggestiveness, this moment of decisiveness is a nice hook, I think, for how the collection speaks to the splendor and sorrow of women, and in a larger sense, to all of us.

Click cover for link.

P.S. Last day to get Goodbye, Maggie for 99c: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1724881876/

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage         

What dreams may come

the picture

Tumbling down the narrow
stone steps, the wet taxi streets,
I know nothing of your dreams,
your mood, your dark mystery nights.

Great things, little things,
rye and stout,

my hand on your waist
for the picture.

the sun

we danced around the room
we stood on the roof
we playacted
hamlet, macbeth, anything
to unsee the clouds heavy on the basilica
clouds now on the balcony,
tomorrow, your journey east
                       to die, to sleep, perchance
into the eye of the sun
                       to dream

the end

I remember the Rilke poem,
dark mystery as you turned your head,
the taxi ride, I stood on the roof and watched,
sweetest sadness of the lone wanderer,
the sound of a name, a wintry
season ahead

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover        

More stores coming in

Schematics and Assemblies of the Cosmic Heart is coming in all over.

Shortlisted for the Faulkner-Wisdom Poetry Prize
NEW YORK, Quimby’s Brooklyn, 536 Metropolitan Ave (718) 384-1215.
AUSTIN, BookPeople, 603 N Lamar, (512) 472-5050.
BOULDER, Beat Book Shop, 1200 Pearl St #10, (303) 444-7111.
CHICAGO, Quimby’s Wicker Park, 1854 W North Ave, (773) 342-0910.
GUANAJUATO, Escalera Librería, Benito Juárez #59, +52 (473) 103-0564.
Soon to be in NEW ORLEANS and more.

For you poor souls who live without a bookstore cool enough, hit the Amazon link above (or get me a contact to your local store … and to local reviewers 🙂 )

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover        

 

La vie en rose

Swans and apples, balcony breakfasts,
skin hunger, a touch, no, a word,
not even a word
a sound

far away
past the cathedral
somewhere in the wind
a sound with just a memory

of meaning, of joy, of sadness

la vie en rose

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover        

Schematics in Mexico

Schematics and Assemblies of the Cosmic Heart now available at Librería Escalera in Guanajuato (Av. Benito Juarez).
Libería Escalera link HERE
Amazon link HERE

white stone, a cathedral of sorts, Medea
roiled a red and golden heat, the fleece gone,
and none left to bury the dead

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover        

Schematics / Poetry Book Club

Schematics and Assemblies of the Cosmic Heart featured in The Poetry Book Club. Buy a copy and drop a quick rating on Amazon. Spread the news. Word sculptures to entertain and nourish the spirit. $9.88 pap, $3.91 Kindle. Cheap and easy support for those of us toiling in the vineyard of the arts. Go ahead. Do it. 
         Schematics and Assemblies Amazon link HERE
         Poetry Book Club link HERE

mountain lantern light
breaking through bamboo and ice
a thousand angels

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover       

Eat the Storms

I was lucky to have my poetry featured on Damien Donnelly’s Dublin poetry podcast, Eat the Storms. You can link to the episode (Spotify) here. (I’m at 33:05-41:40.) Or go straight to the podcast website and browse. You’ll find lots of good stuff from one of the great poetry cities of the world, hosted by the warm and friendly voice of Damien 🙂

Follow the podcast, say hi to Damien, and give him a shoutout for his efforts to give voice to poets of all stripes and stature.

Gary

Link to Amazon here

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover        

 

Schematics and Assemblies of the Cosmic Heart

My new book of poems, Schematics and Assemblies of the Cosmic Heart (117 pages), is now available on Amazon (pap. $9.88, Kindle $3.91). Read it. Rate it. Review it. Pass it on.

Link to Amazon here

* * * Click covers for links * * *

BookCoverImage    year-bfly-cover